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John Rockey

Bold and deeply textured

this 305mm sycamore platter has a very striking rim. Sycamore tends to be quite bland and so lends itself to all forms of decoration which, on a strongly-figured wood like burr oak, may be a step too far!
2014

Deep Bowl

190mm Burr Oak bowl with natural edge.
2009

Crocus form

Acacia has strong colour and figuring, shown to advantage in this natural-edged bowl or vase. 185mm tall.
2010

Moorland Colours

A Classically-shaped hollow form in Blue Cedar, turned across the axis of growth and coloured with the shades of a Dartmoor summer.
2009

Platter with coloured & textured rim

The rim of this 295mm Ash platter has the colours of the sea - or maybe a mackerel? - extending underneath.
2010

Rocking dish

The underside of this ash bowl is continuously curved, so that as things are put in it, it will rock and settle to a different angle. The offset rim is inlaid with yew 'oysters' so that it naturally presents itself at a tilt.
2010

Small Boxes

A selection of trinket and jewellery boxes suitable for a desk or dressing table, or just to enjoy handling!
2010

Coloured bowl

Made from local Ash, this 250mm fruit bowl has been brightly stained inside, and the grain emphasised with coloured wax.
2010

Platter with marbled rim

One of a series of wide-rimmed, 250mm platters in Sycamore, decorated with coloured dyes. This has been a useful learning exercise in the use of colour, discovering combinations which will work to enhance the plain-ness of the Sycamore.
2010

Selection of Platters with marbled rims

With softer colours, these may suggest the bottom of a rock-pool, a river-bed, autumn tints or even nasturtiums... The two outer rims shown here use the same colour combination, but the finished effects are never exactly predictable!
2010

A metallic streak...

honeycombs and crosses the rim of this small sycamore bowl.
2014

Like ancient copper

this 285mm sycamore platter is more subtly textured.
2014

Ferny fronds

suggest seaweed drifting in the deep...
2015

John Rockey

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John Rockey

You just have to pick up a finished piece and touch it! 

It was a fascination with the textures of surfaces that first drew me to woodworking.  After a while, seeking to improve my understanding of why some shapes are more pleasing than others, a course in pottery was taken: using your fingers to form a clay vessel on the wheel is so different to working with wood, but I now see turning as a much more fluid movement, drawing the shape from out of the wood.  This is helping me to move towards more sympathetic projects.

Taking part in various open-studio events and competitions has encouraged the development of new turning skills such as hollow vessels and pierced work, and exhibiting with local painters has prompted the use of colours to subtly enhance some pieces.  Applied colour and texture is now becoming a more dominant feature although much work still retains some characteristic of the growing, living tree: maybe a piece of the bark, a knot or some other deformity.  Part of the challenge is to take an unpreposessing piece of wood, to realise the possibilities that it holds and then to reveal its beauty.  And that's the pleasure, too!

Commissions include half-moon hall tables, low occasional tables, kitchen spice-stores with drawers, display shelving, various footstools, a church lectern, bookcase, and a Native American dough-kneading bowl.  New works in progress are exploring the world of hanging wall sculptures.